Vol. 39 No. 163
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  July 30, 2016
 This Evening
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  Today
  29 Jul, Friday
  28 Jul, Thursday
  27 Jul, Wednesday
  26 Jul, Tuesday
  25 Jul, Monday
  24 Jul, Sunday  


 KRS Dam Level
 Today
 Max:  124.80  Ft
 Level:  99.31  Ft
 Inflow:  5,937  Cusecs
 Outflow:  8,525  Cusecs
 Last Year
 Level:  107.28  Ft
 Inflow:    Cusecs
 Outflow:    Cusecs

 

ECHO OF MAHADAYI WATER DISPUTES TRIBUNAL’S VERDICT: BANDH TOTAL

Caption: The ever-busy K.R. Circle wore a deserted look this morning following the call for dawn-to-dusk Karnataka Bandh.

Mysuru, July 30- With all KSRTC and private buses going off roads, shops, commercial establishments, theatres, hotels, malls, petrol pumps, bars and restaurants in city downing their shutters, the dawn-to-dusk Karnataka Bandh call given by various pro-Kannada organisations protesting the Mahadayi Water Disputes Tribunal’s interim order rejecting the State’s petition seeking release of 7.56 TMC ft. water for drinking water projects, received a good response.

While all thoroughfares in the city wore a deserted look as only a few autos and some vans were seen moving around, the attendance at Schools, Colleges, Banks and Govt. offices, which functioned normally, was very thin.

Donkeys as MPs: Nearly 200 activists of Karnataka Rakshana Vedike (Shivaramegowda faction) staged a unique protest in front of Akashavani in Yadavagiri by taking a procession...more

     Special Coverage   
   Kannada film industry joins Karnataka Bandh
   Warm send off to Dr. C.G. Betsurmath
   Mahadayi Water Dispute: Advocates’ fees cost State Government Rs. 11.93 crore
   Graduation Day of Govt. Nature Cure & Yoga Medical College
   Raman Fellowship to JSS S&T Varsity Professor
   Collapsed wall of heritage structure atop Ch’Hill to be restored soon: DC
   Extension of Anganawadi timings, DC holds meeting
   Micro-Insurance Awareness and Enrolment Mission: Teresian College PG Commerce Dept. adopts seven villages
   BAI Mysore conducts Internship for Civil & CTM students
 


ANOTHER BOOK ON THE HINDUS

A reminder of satanic slokas alongside the divine

For the last about six months I have been labouring with a book, controversial only in India, “The Hindus — An Alternative History” by Wendy Doniger, an American Philologist, Scholar in Sanskrit and Indian Studies. At the pace I was reading the book it would take another six months to complete, without cheating. Well, 692 pages of pure text in rather small print with another 87 pages of index, notes etc., is too much of a book to hold in hand and read in the bed. Even a fractional increase in its type-font size would push up the avoirdupois of the book to an unreasonable level for a reader’s comfort.

But then, it seems, the author by her deep and vast studies of Hindu scriptures in original Sanskrit of Vedas, Puranas and epics like Ramayana and Mahabharata came to realise that Hinduism per se is different to different Hindus! This is under the varnashrama social hierarchical system and beyond extending to those who lived in the jungles. Which is why Wendy Doniger sees a Hindu elephant in Hinduism and recalls the metaphors of six blind men attempting to know what an elephant is.

The blind man who touches its leg concludes it is like a pillar, the one who touches its tail concludes that an elephant is like a rope, the one who feels its belly thinks it is a wall, the trunk becomes a branch of a tree for another, while the one who touches its ear says it is a big hand-fan and the sixth one who feels the tusk says it is like a solid pipe. In Jainism, it is thus explained that truth can be stated in six different ways.

In 1992, I visited a book shop, Barnes and Noble, in Houston, US and bought a fat book about Vedas and Upanishads. Reading it I realised that the books I have read on Vedas and Upanishads so far are well-edited, refined and expurgated, brought out after separating chaff from the grain. I realised there was much chaff in the original scripture that came down orally and later commi...more

     Feature Article  


 
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